From “Controversy? Not for Me!” by Ronald S. Carlson, DDS

In dental surgery, we (I do not!) advocate, unlike our medical colleagues, the retention of gangrenous tissues within the oral cavity. You may know them as “root canals.” Controversy abounded 100 years ago about these “root cadaver canals,” but that was swept under the rug of dental history, about 1945. Well evidenced now is the oral-systemic relationship to arthritic conditions and pain, “oral sepsis.”

One hundred years ago, however, we did not have so-called modern dental implants and their open wounds inviting infection. I liken them to stakes being driven into the jaws, being hit with poisoned arrows. A known fact is that 80% of these dental implants are immediately attended with “peri-implant mucositis,” pain, swelling, similar to “gingivitis” or “periodontitis.” Periodontal medicine now encompasses both periodontal disease and per-implant disease – infected open wounds.

Orthopedic surgeons with whom I associate often remark to me about the blackness and cheese-like quality of the bone of the spinal column when they enter a year later to retrieve rusted titanium screws, exactly the same as [used in] dental implants. My experience is the same!

Unlike the orthopedic surgeons, I send tissue samples routinely to Queen’s Medical Center for histo-pathological review and get reports back such as, “present are marked acute/chronic inflammation, fibrosis, granulation tissue, reactive bone, necrotic (dead) bone, cysts, odontogenic tumors, non-supportive condensing osteitis, abscesses with actinomyces” (a gram negative fungal bacteria which produces pus in the body – like candida).

My over 30 years of clinical scientific research has 240 samples that verify the above conditions around root canal teeth and dental implants. Google Endodontic-Endotoxemia: Our Current Dilemma or look for the work of Weston Price, DDS, or George Meinig’s book Root Canal Cover-Up Exposed.

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